Sault Ste. Marie

Français

Sault Ste. Marie

Sault Ste. Marie is forever linked to its river, “Bawating” or “place of the rapids”, named by The Ojibwe people. Even French colonists, when they arrived in the 17th century, called the area “Saults de Sainte-Marie”, translated to “St. Mary’s Falls”, again after the spectacular rushing waters. Much of your cultural experience in town can take place along its banks, with galleries, museums and street art rolling along the river. And beyond the city’s limits, with the river situated as a natural highway into the Great Lakes and the ‘further north’, it’s no surprise that the Soo and its river have thrived together.



Day One

STROLL THE SCULPTURE PARK & ART GALLERY OF ALGOMA – 10:00 AM

Founded in 1975, the Art Gallery of Algoma has studios, a cafe, and four exhibition spaces. Their collection of nearly 5000 works has a rigorous Indigenous art collection, including work from John Laford and Norval Morrisseau. The gallery also has a large selection from the Group of Seven and Dr. Roberta Bondar. For anyone looking to brush up on their creative skills, the gallery holds various classes and creative workshops throughout the year, including Woodland Style paint classes.

Conveniently located right next door to the Art Gallery of Algoma, the Elsie Savoie Sculpture Park is home to a number of important and eclectic works. Spot an arch composed of leaping dolphins or a totem pole fashioned out of used car parts. And feel the sense of community while you stroll, even in its namesake: the park was named after a devoted volunteer and early supporter of the Art Gallery of Algoma.

Feeling hungry after your gallery visit? Walk over to nearby Queen Street to take in all the fine culinary fare on offer. We hear that Tandoori Garden has the best curry in town!

SAULT STE. MARIE MUSEUM — 1:30 PM

TAKE IN THE HISTORY OF THE SOO

After your lunch break, head over to the Sault Ste. Marie Museum, which is located in an old Edwardian post office. The museum chronicles the history of the Soo, from when the ancestors of the Ojibwe people first walked along its shores, through to French and British colonization, and into the present day.

The museum’s three floors are full of galleries, displays, and vignettes, including the Walter Wallace Military Gallery, the Sports Hall of Fame, and the Discover Gallery where kids can get hands on.

Photo Credit: Sault Ste. Marie Museum Website.

THE ERMATINGER CLERGUE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE & OLD STONE HOUSE — 3:00 PM

A slice of 19th century life awaits you at this National Historic Site. Here you’ll find some of the oldest stone buildings in Ontario, which were built for notable fur trader Charles Oakes Ermatinger, and later housed the American industrialist Francis Hector Clergue. Both Ermantinger and Clergue were instrumental in building up industry and infrastructure in the area, allowing the Soo to grow into the commercial hub that it is today.

Stroll through the historic chambers of the Old Stone House and the Blockhouse, or wander its gardens, where period-specific produce and flowers are grown. You can visit the nearby Heritage Discovery Centre to take an interactive tour of 19th century Sault Ste. Marie.

SOAR AT THE BUSHPLANE CENTRE — 3:00 PM

Your final of three options for an afternoon museum will have you find your wings! In Ontario’s northern reaches, the bush plane is vital, enabling shipping and transportation across vast distances.

At this museum, take in dozens of bush planes from across decades. Relax in the theatre and learn about battling forest fires in Ontario, from the air and on the ground, or hop in the Flight Adventure Simulator and experience the unique aerial views of Sault Ste. Marie and Algoma.

Photo Credit: City of Sault Ste. Marie.

TAKE THE SCENIC ROUTE — 5:00 PM

WIND DOWN WITH A TRIP ALONG THE HUB TRAIL

Sault Ste. Marie is a city with a view, so put on a comfortable pair of walking shoes or grab a bike, and head down the Hub Trail. The trail circumvents the entire city, including a wonderful portion running along the waterfront. It’s a great way to see the river and its American sister city of the same name, Sault Ste Marie, Michigan, across the water. If you’re keen to take a more casual route, the boardwalk also offers a fantastic view and includes a few spots to stop and look at the river.

Either way, you’ll eventually find your way to the Canal National Historic Site, where you can watch ships cruise by or learn about the history of the locks.

Just across the canal is White Fish Island, a popular spot for a leisurely stroll or a beautiful sunset walk.  Here, you can take a self-guided, 2-hour tour to learn about Indigenous heritage and culture. This has always been a place of importance for the Ojibway: Elders from Batchawana share that when the Creator told the crane to choose a homeland, he flew in search of it and settled in Bawating. Currently a gathering place for the Three Fires Confederacy between the Ojibway, Potawatomi, and Odawa Peoples. While you’re there, look out for the interpretive signs to learn more of this history!

This walking tour will have you work up an appetite right before dinner – for a late evening bite choose between Chinese, Italian, Thai, and Middle Eastern.

Photo Credit: Sault Ste. Marie Tourism Website saultstemarie.ca

Day Two

AN ADVENTURE OUT OF THE CITY — 10:00 AM

PADDLE, PAINT, AND TREK WITH THRIVE TOURS

Connect to nature on a guided adventure by either canoe, kayak, hiking, or snowshoeing. Whether you’re a beginner or experienced, Thrive Tours is has an option for anyone looking to enjoy nature or learn to kayak. Their outings range from a half-day, 2-hour excursion to a full 6-hour trek. We recommend the tours featuring Indigenous ecology philosophies as well as the Woodland Style paint-and-paddle workshop. Inquire online ahead of time, as pre-registration is required.

For a quick bite on your way back into town, choose Chummy’s Grill. Home of an “All Day Breakfast” and renowned burgers and home cut fries. Don’t miss their ‘R Smokin Store’ drive-thru, which is open 7 a.m. to midnight, 365 days a year.

THE OLD CHAPEL AND THE SHINGWAUK CENTRE — 2:00 PM

EXPLORE IN THE EAST

Take in the farther out city spots in the east end. Head to the Bishop Fauqier Memorial Chapel and the neighboring Shingwauk Centre. The Gothic- and Tudor-style chapel (constructed between 1881 and 1883) is named after the first Anglican Bishop of Algoma, and was built to service the Shingwauk Residential School, which ran until 1970.

The University of Algoma took over the site of the residential school and over time has worked to research, document and share the history of the residential school program. You can go for a tour at the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre or visit the archives to learn more about the lives of survivors.

Photo Credit: City of Sault Ste. Marie

THE SOO'S HISTORIC NEIGHBOURHOODS — 4:00 PM

Still in the east, you’ll find a handful of blocks that contain some of Sault Ste. Marie’s most charming homes, storefronts and hotels. Wander the streets and you’ll see lovingly- restored examples of Georgian, Victorian and Edwardian architecture.

For the final stop on your journey, it’s time to turn your gaze to natural delights. Bellevue Park has an abundance of flora and fauna to explore, as well as a greenhouse full of decorative blooms.  If you want to get a little closer to the water, walk across the small land bridge to Topsail Island and check out its miniature beach. This is the perfect place for a final sunset to end your trip to the Soo.

HAVE TIME FOR A DETOUR?

Looking to explore a little further afield? Sault Ste. Marie is a major hub for outdoor exploration, and with a twin sister city across the river, there’s plenty to do if you’re looking to extend your northern adventure.

 

AGAWA CANYON & PICTOGRAPHS

Located to the far north of Sault Ste. Marie, these ancient trails house some of the oldest Indigenous art in the country: the famed Pictographs of Agawa.


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE


NEED A MAP?

This guide represents a weekend-long experience, highlighting one of the many wonderful destinations in the area. To suggest a destination for a future guide, please contact us.

All editorial decisions were made at the sole discretion of Ontario Culture Days staff. This guide was written by Li Robbins.


We acknowledge the support of the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario.


Six Nations of the Grand River

Photo courtesy of Six Nations Tourism

Français

Six Nations of the Grand River

Located south of Brantford and running alongside the Grand River, this southwestern territory in Ontario is brimming with history that spans thousands of years. The Six Nations of the Grand River is the only reserve in the continent where all Haudenosaunee nations live together. The Haudenosaunee Confederacy (which translates to “they build houses”) is made up of the Mohawk, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, Seneca and Tuscarora nations. Together they contribute to the reserve’s rich arts, natural elements, history, and ongoing legacy.

November 15, 2022



Day One

HER MAJESTY’S ROYAL CHAPEL OF THE MOHAWKS  – 10:00 AM

BEYOND THE STAINED GLASS WINDOWS

When you first arrive at Her Majesty’s Royal Chapel of the Mohawks, you’ll see a quaint building with eight beautiful stained-glass windows. But beyond the infrastructure and picturesque nature surrounding the area lies a history that spans 300 years. Built in 1785, it’s the oldest surviving church in Ontario. The Chapel offers workshops and guided walking tours for visitors to learn more about the history of the Six Nations and its relationship with settler Canada. You can learn more through talks led by community members on this complex history as well as perspectives on reconciliation from Six Nations community members.

Her Majesty’s Royal Chapel of the Mohawks. Photo credit: Mark Burnham / Six Nations Tourism

MOHAWK INSTITUTE RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL AND THE WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE – 12:00 PM

LEARNING ABOUT RECONCILIATION

Delve deeper into important history through the Mohawk Institute Residential School and the Woodland Cultural Centre. The Centre was established in 1972 after the closure of the residential school. It is now one of the most extensive facilities in Canada managed by First Nations, with over 50,000 artifacts in its collection and a library of Indigenous-only books, research, and more. Want to learn more? Book a Truth and Reconciliation presentation to further understand the latest progress report and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 10 Principles and 94 Calls to Action. The Centre also offers virtual tours of the former Mohawk Institute Residential School, which was in session for 140 years.

Next, visit the locally-owned Burger Barn for lunch. The restaurant is known for having the ultimate comfort food with huge portions. The restaurant – which looks like a barn from the outside —boasts fresh 8oz ground patties and a variety of styled burgers that have toppings like macaroni and cheese and pulled pork.

Woodland Cultural Centre. Photo credit: Woodland Cultural Centre

KAYANASE GREENHOUSE - 4:00 PM

A HORTICULTURAL TOUR

Now 15 years old, Kayanase Greenhouse is dedicated to restoring the remaining nature after the construction of the Red Hill Valley Parkway. It’s the perfect spot to learn more about ecological restoration and traditional harvesting and planting methods. The greenhouse offers native plants and seeds to purchase, such as wild bergamots and tree saplings. This area is open seasonally, so be mindful of this when you visit.

Kayanase Greenhouse. Photo credit:The Heart of Ontario

CHIEFSWOOD PARK – 5:00 PM

A DAY OF PLAY

Right next door to Kayanase is Chiefswood Park, known for its forest trails, historical exhibits and outdoor activities. Secure a full- or half-day experience to learn about Haudenosaunee culture and art. Enjoy sports? Pick up the history of the iconic sport lacrosse, and play it too. Want to grasp how food is harvested traditionally? AR/VR experiences are available to learn about the Three Sisters. In the evening, end the day paddling or lounging at the Grand River. Did you know you can also spend the night at Chiefswood Park? Their accommodations range from different-sized cabins to tent camping or glamping in a Riverside Hut.

Chiefswood Park. Photo credit: Mark Burnham/ Six Nations Tourism

Day Two

SIX NATIONS TRAIL – 10:00 AM

TAKING IN NATURE ON THE TRAIL

Explore the largest Carolinian forest in Southern Ontario while walking the Six Nations Trail. The trail is suitable for almost everyone and takes about 15 minutes to complete. A guided tour will help you learn more about the Indigenous plants in the area.

Six Nations Trail. Photo credit: Mark Burnham / Six Nations Tourism

CHIEFSWOOD NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE; YAWÉKON – 11:00 AM

AN ARTIST’S PARADISE AND TOP CHEF DISHES

Tour Chiefswood National Historic site, built in the mid-1800s for Chief George Johnson. The site is the birthplace of Indigenous poet, performer, and author E. Pauline Johnson, also known as Tekahionwake. Her poetry is recognized for its strong portrayal of Indigenous women and children. Some of her most notable poems include “A Cry from an Indian Wife,” about the Riel Rebellion, and “Ojitsoh,” about a Mohawk wife who is kidnapped by a Huron captor.

For lunch, try some Haudenosaunee cuisine at Yawékon by Tawnya Brant. Brant is a local chef and former competitor of Top Chef Canada. Yawékon means “it tastes good” in Mohawk, which is quite fitting for this special food spot. Brant likes to use ingredients she grew at home to make dishes like Three Sister soup, and blueberry and pan-seared Bay of Quinte Mohawk trout cakes.

Chiefswood National Historic Site. Photo credit: The Heart of Ontario

SIX NATIONS ARTISANS – 2:00 PM

HANDMADE JEWELRY, CRAFTS & MORE

Support Six Nations artisans by shopping locally. Sapling and Flint is named after the twin boys born to Skywoman’s daughter, according to the Ohswekén:’a Creation Story – a fitting name for a shop run by twin sisters! Their handmade jewelry is made of gold, wampum, and sterling silver. Proceeds contribute to cultural projects in Six Nations. Ribbon skirts, pants and plush reversible blankets can be found at GOTribalwear. Or visit I&S Crafts and Supplies for hand-made jewelry and Delica beading supplies.

Iroqrafts is the oldest and largest arts and crafts store in Six Nations, with plenty of goodies to choose from. You’ll find local creations including beadwork, soapstone sculptures, moccasins, and turtle shells. Authentic furs, fur hats, boots, hide, and leather goods are available to purchase as well.

Iroqrafts. Photo credit: The Heart of Ontario

WINGS & BINGO – 5:00 PM

DINNER AND A GAME

End the day with a hearty dinner at Village Pizza and Wings. The restaurant is known for its — you guessed it — stone oven pizza and jumbo wings. The generous portions will not leave you hungry.

Next, test your luck and contribute to the community with Six Nations Bingo. Join matinee and evening sessions where you can win jackpot prizes in the thousands. Six Nations Bingo donates 40 per cent of its annual profits to educational community programs across the region.


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE


NEED A MAP?

This guide represents a weekend-long experience, highlighting one of the many wonderful destinations in the area. To suggest a destination for a future guide, please contact us.

Ontario Culture Days thanks its tourism partners Six Nations Tourism and The Heart of Ontario for their support and assistance with this article. All editorial decisions were made at the sole discretion of Ontario Culture Days staff. This guide was written by Ramona Leitao.


We acknowledge the support of the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario.


Owen Sound, Path to Freedom

Photo by Melissa Crannie

Owen Sound, Path to Freedom

Owen Sound has been called “The Scenic City” with good reason. At the mouths of the Pottawatomi and Sydenham Rivers, it’s beautifully situated. It’s also home to fascinating history as the northernmost “station” on the Underground Railroad — the path to escaping slavery once the British Empire abolished it in 1834. Make sure to take time to explore the city’s fine museums, eat equally fine food, and check out the Sound’s great music scene. It’s a small city, but it has a big personality.

November 10, 2022



WEST SIDE TOUR — 10:00 AM

FROM SALVATION CORNERS TO DAMNATION CORNERS

Owen Sound is eminently walkable. Start with a coffee on the East Side, now known as the River District, (Frogs Pond and Birgit’s Bakery Café among other spots), strolling through famously named intersections: Salvation Corners (many churches) and Damnation Corners (infamous taverns of yesteryear). Head west to delve into history and architecture. The West Side Tour has over a dozen stops including the Kennedy Foundry, a machine shop that built WWll ship propellors and was one of a number of Owen Sound businesses to employ Black workers. Molock House was the home of Francis Ebenezer Molock, who escaped from slavery with help from famous Underground Railroad “conductor,” Harriet Tubman. An early congregation of what’s now known as the British Methodist Episcopal Church held Owen Sound’s first Emancipation Picnic, a tradition that continues to this day. On the architecture tip: look out for Wilkinson House, restored to its Arts and Craft beauty, as well as notable examples of homes in the Queen Anne Revival style.

Touring the West Side. Photo by Colin Field.

A MUNIFICENCE OF MUSEUMS — 12:00 PM

ROOTS AND WINGS

There’s no denying that Owen Sound, built along the Niagara Escarpment within the Bruce Peninsula, has unique natural beauty, including four gorgeous waterfalls in the area. But there are also wonders created by human hands, evidenced in some excellent museums and galleries focused on telling regional stories. There’s the story of Canada’s most famous flying ace, told at the Billy Bishop Home & Museum. There’s the story of Grey County’s diverse roots: Grey Roots Museum & Archives commemorates the struggles and victories of the area’s Black community. Then there’s the story of Tom Thomson. The Tom Thomson Art Gallery honours the iconic artist (who grew up north of Owen Sound), as well as hosting a collection of contemporary artists who engage in landscape, as Thomson himself so famously did. And you’ll find local art throughout the city – look out for more than 20 public artworks produced by the Gallery or independent artists and collaborators.

Photo courtesy of Grey Roots Museum & Archives.

HARRISON PARK — 3:00 PM

WALK THE FREEDOM TRAIL

 Harrison Park’s Freedom Trail is both figuratively and literally a moving way to explore some of the story of Black settlers in Grey County. It’s a ten-kilometre self-guided trail connected to former slaves who lived and worked in the area. Visit the Black History Cairn, designed by Bonita Johnson de Matteis, a local artist who herself is a descendant of escaped slaves. The cairn traces some of the routes people were forced to take into slavery, and pursued to take out of it. Details include windows modelled on the Little Zion Church (the first Black church in Owen Sound). In August, visitors won’t want to miss the annual Emancipation festival and picnic, held every summer since 1862 to mark the anniversary of the Slavery Abolition Act of 1834. That act abolished slavery in most British colonies, freeing enslaved Africans in a number of countries, including Canada. It’s a special event — among other things it’s thought to be the longest-running Emancipation festival in North America. Harrison Park itself has been called the “jewel in the crown” of Owen Sound with 40 hectares of streams, forest, gardens and playgrounds. Visitors may wish to stroll alongside or paddle the river, perhaps stopping by Harrison Park Inn restaurant, a favourite local landmark.

Black History Cairn. Photo by Melissa Crannie

MUSIC — 7:00 PM

SOUNDS IN THE SOUND

Owen Sound is known for its lively music scene, from classical (as the home of the Georgian Bay Symphony Orchestra), to folk, blues, jazz and rock. Open mic nights and songwriters’ circles are a regular feature around town, so check out spots like Heartwood Hall, Harmony Centre, The Pub and Jazzmyn’s — the last two also popular spots to dine.

Of course, if you want to consider a full range of Owen Sound dining options have a look at the city’s “Savour Owen Sound” venues. They’re worth a visit at any time of year, though the annual, award-winning month-long Savour event may up the culinary stakes. Or visit Naagan, an Indigenous dining experience by chef Zach Keeshig, operating out of the Owen Sound Farmers’ Market. Either way, Owen Sound aims to satisfy your inner foodie with hyper-local deliciousness.

Harmony Centre. Photo credit Ed Matthews

DETOUR

FALL FOR OWEN SOUNDS’ WATERFALLS

When it comes to waterfalls Ontario is rightfully renowned for majestic Niagara, but Owen Sound also claims waterfall glory, thanks to the rocky Niagara Escarpment. Inglis Falls is perhaps most spectacular of the four falls in the area, particularly in winter when intricate ice formations charm snowshoers and cross-country skiers. Pretty little Weavers Creek Falls is accessible from the south end of Harrison Park — adventurers might even hike or snowshoe from there to Inglis Falls, just two and a half kilometres on the Bruce Trail. Jones Falls, west of town on the Pottawatomi, may lure you in springtime for the exquisite Trilliums and Columbines, plus an impressive spring runoff. Last and certainly not least, the horseshoe-shaped Indian Falls: a one-kilometre walk up the escarpment (stairs ease your way) through hardwood forest, giving it definite autumnal appeal.

Weavers Creek. Photo courtesy of Grey County.

YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE

This guide represents a weekend-long experience, highlighting one of the many wonderful destinations in the area. To suggest a destination for a future guide, please contact us.

All editorial decisions were made at the sole discretion of Ontario Culture Days staff. This guide was written by Li Robbins.


We acknowledge the support of the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario.


Windsor, Border City

Photo courtesy of Ontario Heritage Trust

Français

Windsor, Border City

Stretched along the Detroit River, Windsor is a hub of cultural, industrial and creative innovation. The region is speckled with galleries, concert venues, international foods, and – as Canada’s southernmost city and a historic entry point into our nation – rich in Black history.

As a border city, Windsor played an important role in the Underground Railroad, an anti-slavery freedom movement that helped thousands to escape enslavement and start new lives in Canada where slavery had been abolished in 1834. This heritage is preserved in local museums and through annual cultural events.

October 11, 2022



Day One

RIVERFRONT — 10:00 AM

SCENIC VIEWS AND SCULPTURE

In the morning, start your trip downtown getting to know Windsor’s riverfront, which flows past a variety of landmark experiences. The Detroit River has always been a place of convergence – before settler contact, Indigenous peoples called it Wawiiatanong, meaning ‘where the river bends.”

Whether you travel on foot or pedal along calming bike paths, you must pause to explore the Windsor Sculpture Park. This outdoor gallery holds over 33 works of public art by internationally recognized artists, including Haydn Llewellyn Davies, Sorel Etrog, and Xiaofeng Yin. With waterfront views and paved pathways, this free-entry park can be enjoyed throughout all four seasons.

Photo courtesy of Tourism Windsor-Essex

JOSIAH HENSON MUSEUM OF AFRICAN-CANADIAN HISTORY OR CHIMCZUK MUSEUM — 1:00 PM

RECLAIMING BLACK HISTORY

Discover Black history on a drive to the beautiful village of Dresden about 1.5 hours away. Here you can visit the Josiah Henson Museum of African-Canadian History, an Ontario Heritage Trust stewarded site. Henson was a preacher, author and, while escaping from slavery, a conductor on the Underground Railroad, rescuing 118 enslaved people in his time. Once in Upper Canada, Henson turned his passion for self-reliance and education into a new settlement, Dawn, with a school, farming community and industries. He was fictionalized as Uncle Tom in an anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. But this was an identity and name he refuted – so, the museum has recently renamed itself to reflect his objection. The sites of the Dawn settlement and its Underground Railroad stories are now told here through interactive exhibits, Black History Month programming and special events to mark Emancipation Day.

Another option in Windsor’s downtown core is the Chimczuk Museum, which features a walk-through of Windsor from the pre-historic era to the modern day, including a darkened tunnel-like space which tells the stories of those who traveled the Underground Railroad.

Photo: Ontario Southwest/Chatham-Kent Tourism, courtesy of Ontario Heritage Trust

THE CHRYSLER THEATRE — 7:00 PM

STAND-UP, SINGERS AND STAGE DOORS

Return downtown for an evening at the Chrysler Theatre. Situated within the St. Clair College Centre for the Arts, which boasts a competitive musical theatre program, this facility is abuzz with creative talent and offers another stunning waterfront view. There’s something for every audience, including concerts, stand-up comedy, movie nights, drag shows, and professional theatre and dance.

Photo Credit Walter C.

Day Two

RUM RUNNERS BUS TOUR — 10:00 AM

DANCE THE CHARLESTON

Rum and whisky flowed along the Windsor-Detroit border during Prohibition in the 1920s, when spirits and alcohol were outlawed on both sides of the border. For an immersive experience, hop on the Rum Runner’s Tour bus and let a colourful, funny cast of roaring twenties characters take you back in time. Your ticket to this multi-hour tour includes lunch in a reimagined speakeasy filled with piano music of the era and boards to dance the Charleston on, if you’re feeling adventurous and up for a spin.

Photo courtesy of Tourism Windsor-Essex

ART WINDSOR-ESSEX (AWE) — 3:00 PM

AFTERNOON AT THE ART GALLERY

Come back to current times with contemporary art, found at the renowned gallery Art Windsor-Essex. With nearly 4000 works of art, it is the largest public art gallery in Southwestern Ontario and includes an extensive collection of works by Indigenous artists, like Norval Morrisseau and Bonnie Devine, and artwork by Black artists Charles McGee, Kara Springer and Tim Whiten, in addition to related thematic exhibitions. You’ll also find work by a diverse array of artists at the Arts Council Windsor & Region in the Artspeak Gallery, and through their Art.Work workshops and New Voices program.

Later, you can grab a quick bite near the gallery, with The Mini Restaurant (Vietnamese), Dhesi Swaad (Indian), or Steak n Shawarma (Middle Eastern). Or for more delicious options a 5 minute drive away, try Bubi’s Awesome Eats for gourmet burgers, Native Wonders Gourmet Grub’s Indigenous inspired and traditional fare, or Mazaar with its Lebanese cuisine.

Photo courtesy of Art Windsor-Essex

Day THREE

SANDWICH FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH — 10:00 AM

BUILDING BLOCKS OF HISTORY

On your final day, dive deeper into Black history around the Windsor area. The first stop is Sandwich First Baptist Church. Sandwich was a town amalgamated into Windsor in 1935, but its history stands tall in this National Historic Site, the oldest – and still active – Black church in Canada. Noted for its simplicity and modest design, the church is built with bricks made of clay dug from the Detroit River. More importantly, the bricks were molded and laid by hand by Underground Railroad refugees, freemen, and runaways who settled in Sandwich. They formed a congregation which further rescued and sheltered more people escaping through the Underground Railroad, often using hidden rooms in the church to shelter newcomers from authorities.

Photo courtesy of Tourism Windsor-Essex

AMHERSTBERG FREEDOM MUSEUM AND FORT MALDEN — 11:30 AM

SITES TO THE SOUTH

Next stop is small town Amherstburg, 25 minutes south of your morning’s activities. Here you’ll find two museums: for War of 1812 history and re-enactments, go through Fort Malden; for African-Canadian history, spend the afternoon at the Amherstburg Freedom Museum.

Amherstburg was for many the last stop on the Underground Railroad; between 1800 and 1860, 50,000 men, women and children passed through or settled in this sanctuary. Those people would’ve seen the same sites preserved today by the Amherstburg Freedom Museum, like the Nazrey A.M.E. Church and the home of George Taylor, a formerly enslaved man. The museum offers guided and self-guided tours for walk-ins and tour groups, and if you come during certain seasons, you can catch cultural programming like Ribs & Ragtime and Emancipation Celebrations. Curators at the museum put together limited-run exhibits, in addition to a permanent collection of artifacts that educate and inspire.

For lunch, enjoy a picnic in nearby Centennial Park or along the banks of the Amherstburg Harbour.

Photo: ©Parks Canada / Fort Malden National Historic Site

POINT PELEE NATIONAL PARK — 3:00 PM

ECO EXPLORATION

For an unforgettable nature experience, take a scenic drive to Point Pelee National Park, Canada’s most ecologically diverse National Park. Birdwatching here is renowned during the migratory seasons and avid watchers can participate in the Festival of Birds, a 3-day event in May. More than wildlife, the park is also ripe for swimming, canoeing, cycling, or hiking the trails. In the fall, enjoy the annual afternoon arts market, Art at the oTENTiks, or biweekly stargazing nights. The park remains open in the winter, where you can explore quiet trails muffled by snow, surrounded by natural ice formations.

Photo Courtesy of Destination Ontario

LEAMINGTON — 7:00 PM

LOCAL EATS

Finish your day by choosing from a selection of well-regarded restaurants in Windsor including Eddy’s Mediterranean Bistro, India 47, Thai Time, or Zuleeats (which promises to take your tastebuds on a trip to Ghana with savoury pies, sausage rolls and butter tarts!).

Image courtesy of Chúuk

WANT TO TAKE A DETOUR?

Should you find yourself with additional time to enjoy the region, visiting Pelee Island is a must. This beautiful location houses a rare Carolinian forest, two provincial nature reserves and more than a handful of conservation areas. Wine and history buffs may want to sign up for a Pelee Island Adventures tour of Vin Villa – the most historically significant winery in North America. As part of the tour, you’ll be offered delicious tastings, and the opportunity to wander through ruins and a restored basement that will make you feel as if you’ve travelled back in time.


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE

This guide represents a weekend-long experience, highlighting one of the many wonderful destinations in the area. To suggest a destination for a future guide, please contact us.

All editorial decisions were made at the sole discretion of Ontario Culture Days staff. Jacqueline Scott, Glodeane Brown, Eilish Waller and Kaitlyn Patience contributed to this culture guide.
.


We acknowledge the support of the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario.


Belleville and Bay of Quinte

Photo Credit Justen Soule

Français

Belleville and Bay of Quinte

Its official name isn’t the Beautiful Bay of Quinte but it could be — given the undeniable charms of what locals just call the Bay. As a newer travel destination, it has a very old history — back in the 12th century it was the birthplace of Tekanawita (the Peacemaker) who brought a constitution of peace to the original Five Nations Iroquois Confederacy. Today, the Bay of Quinte is fast becoming known for arts and culture (not to mention plenty of good eats).

September 9, 2022



Day One

PRESQU’ILE PARK — 10:00 AM

FROM SHOREBIRDS TO SONGBIRDS

Birding is really taking off (pun intended!) as one of the fastest-growing hobbies in North America. Presqu’ile Park, a hot spot for bird migration with some 338 species identified, is a perfect vantage point to admire both shorebirds and songbirds. With its long sandy beach and Lake Ontario views the park is also ideal for walking, biking and camping. (The marsh boardwalk has been called “a gem” by more than one visitor.) To learn about the area’s natural and cultural history, stop in at both The Nature Centre and The Lighthouse Interpretive Centre, which highlights the park’s cultural legacy and its connection to Lake Ontario’s past.

Credit: Courtney Klumper 

QUINTE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY — 12:00 PM

THE WONDERS OF THE WORLD

Lunch in nearby Brighton (try The Whistling Duck for patio views of the lake) or press on to Trenton, where culinary possibilities range from Gogi Korean Grill to Tomasso’s Italian Grille. The sparkling new Quinte Museum of Natural History in Trenton (now incorporated into the City of Quinte West) is a must-stop for those intrigued by the wonders of the world. Opening with the acclaimed World of Dinosaurs exhibit, the QMNH has a relationship with the Royal Ontario Museum, meaning expect to see unique specimens from the ROM on long-term loan. It’s not the only compelling museum in town either — the National Air Force Museum of Canada explores the country’s aviation history and has a sixteen-acre air park devoted to flying machines past and present.

Photo courtesy of Quinte Museum of Natural History

DOWNTOWN BELLEVILLE — 3:00 PM

HISTORIC CHARM; CONTEMPORARY COOL

Sitting pretty on the Bay and the banks of the Moira, Belleville is a rare find: equal parts historic charm and contemporary cool. Pop in and out of galleries sprinkled throughout downtown, including Belleville Art Association and Gallery 121 (both cooperatives featuring the work of locals) or the John M. Parrott Gallery in the Belleville Public Library. Keep your eyes open for public art too, notably local artist Chris Bennett’s colourful murals adorning a number of establishments. One is on the back patio of Chilangos Mexican restaurant, which, incidentally, is a choice Belleville culinary destination. (Another option is The Lark — intimate, modern, and known for creative cocktails.) Clothes hounds go chic and indie (or thrift) at a clutch of boutiques including Pure Honey, Boretski Gallery, That Special Touch, and Miss Priss. Belleville’s historic architecture provides an elegant backdrop for wandering, and if quoins, window hoods and elaborately detailed porches are your thing check out Bellevue Terrace, luxurious three-story townhouses built in 1876.
A short walk (or three-minute drive) East lands you in the Old East Hill Neighbourhood. The historic homes on these streets date back to the 1800’s, and are the perfect setting for Belleville’s annual September Porchfest – a free, family-friendly music festival which sees thousands of attendees enjoying music played from porches, hosted by the local Rotary Club of Belleville.

Photo Credit Ash Murell

THE EMPIRE AND MORE — 7:00 PM

THE THEATRES OF BELLEVILLE

For a small place, Belleville (population fifty-some thousand), sure loves its theatre. There’s The Empire, a vintage 1938 theatre presenting indie films and live performances (including some of Canada’s biggest name artists). There’s River & Main Theatre Co. (at the intimate storefront Theatre in the Wings). And there’s the Belleville Theatre Guild (top notch community theatre for over seventy years). Oh, and if for some reason you’re heading back west, note that actors also tread the boards at the City of Quinte’s Old Church Theatre and the Brighton Barn Theatre.

Credit: Jacob Cote Photography

Day Two

TYENDINAGA MOHAWK TERRITORY — 10:00 AM

DISTINCTIVE INDIGENOUS ARTS AND CRAFTS

You’ll know you’ve arrived when you start seeing Mohawk language on street signs and buildings. Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory was established in 1784, a forced relocation leading to the loss of ancestral homelands. (Visit the Mohawk Landing on Bayshore Road to learn more.) Among the traditions of Kanienʼkehá꞉ka (Mohawk) people is distinctive original artwork and crafts. Make sure to stop at Native Renaissance, featuring emerging and well-known Indigenous artists, notably Thomas B. Maracle whose stone, wood and corn husk creations are prized internationally. Other must-stops include Rebecca Maracle’s Gallery & Gifts, showcasing exquisite feather art; Soaring Eagle Native Arts & Crafts for meticulously handcrafted work with all-natural materials, and Eagle POD Gallery, with its striking, one-of-a-kind sculptures by David R. Maracle. After this feast for the eyes, you may want a feast for the stomach: you’ll find fresh walleye at many local restaurants.

Photo credit KimberLee and David R. Maracle, Native Expressions

HER MAJESTY’S ROYAL CHAPEL OF THE MOHAWKS — 1:00 PM

HISTORY AT THE CHAPEL

Mohawks were military allies of the British Crown during the American Revolution and part of that legacy is embodied by the chapel at Christ Church. It’s one of a small number of royal chapels outside of Great Britain and is of historic significance to both the Indigenous and colonial history of Turtle Island/Canada. The church itself, welcoming both Indigenous and non-Indigenous worshippers, was built by Mohawks and contains a triptych in the Mohawk language. Outside of Sunday services hours are variable, but it’s worth stopping by just to gaze at the 19th century Gothic revival style architecture.

Photo credit Monika Kraska

TYENDINAGA CAVERN AND CAVES — 2:00 PM

AN UNDERGROUND ADVENTURE
Fantastic fossils, cool depths, and a resident ghost: all of the above are found below! Meaning in the caves, which date back thousands of years. Geology lovers should get excited – the fossils found here connect sightseers to the extensive history of this natural wonder. Considered an easy and accessible adventure (at a small enough scale that even littles can enjoy), the Tyendinaga Cavern and Caves are also about ethical and sustainable tourism that gives curious visitors a chance to learn something of the local history and geology.

Photo courtesy of Tyendinaga Cavern and Cave

GREATER NAPANEE ‘PALLET’ABLE ART PROJECT — 5:00 PM

ART ON THE SKIDS

The ‘Pallet’able Art Project is public art literally created on wooden industrial skids and pallets. Twenty-some charming original works dot the city, making splashes of bright, eye-catching colour. Navigate your way from pallet to pallet via Greater Napanee’s handy online map. (You may want to incorporate a little local history too, via the town’s historic walking tour map.)

Photo credit: Andrew Clarke

MUSIC — 7:30 PM

PINTS, PUBS, MUSIC

Start your evening relaxing at one of Greater Napanee’s favourite spots, for instance by having a brew at the wee patio of multiple-award-winning Napanee Beer Company. Another option, the (similarly award-winning) Waterfront River Pub and Terrace, located right on the Napanee. (Trivia note: the Napanee River is known for having its own “seiche,” a tidal effect due in part to the strong winds on Lake Ontario’s north shore.) The Waterfront often features local musicians, and for national talent check out the Starstop Concert Series, designed to catch top Canadian talent crossing the country on tour. One final music note: for concerts beneath the skies (and by the river), on a summer afternoon watch for the Music by the River series in lovely Conservation Park.

Photo Credit Norman Paul

YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE


NEED A MAP?

This guide represents a weekend-long experience, highlighting one of the many wonderful destinations in the area. To suggest a destination for a future guide, please contact us.

All editorial decisions were made at the sole discretion of Ontario Culture Days staff. This guide was written by Li Robbins.


We acknowledge the support of the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario.


Guelph

Photo Credit Brandon Marsh Photography

Français

Guelph

Guelph is famed for world-class arts festivals, its historic downtown and beautiful waterways, the Speed and Eramosa Rivers, as well as the birthplace of “In Flanders Fields” poet, John McCrae. Oh, and then there’s the beer. Seriously, the abundance of excellent craft beer has led some to declare Guelph as truly “brewtiful.”

August 5, 2022



Day One

CIVIC MUSEUM — 11:00 AM

THE STORY OF A CITY

You can’t miss this museum — it’s located next to the stunning Basilica of Our Lady, an impressive example of High Victorian Gothic Revival style reminiscent of a medieval French cathedral. The museum itself shares Guelph stories from the era long before colonization — Guelph is built on the homelands of Anishinaabek peoples – to the city’s founding to present-day life in this diverse and vibrant community. The museum is a place to learn, and a place to play. Many a child has revelled in the The Families Gallery with its cool, interactive exhibits.

Photo of Guelph Civic Museum courtesy Brandon Marsh Photography.

MARKET SQUARE — 12:30 PM

THERE’S MAGIC IN THE SQUARE

Some city squares have a kind of magic to them, and Market Square is definitely one. Pretty in winter when ice skaters twirl, and sweet in summer when the rink turns into giant splash pad. At any time of year the historic limestone buildings make it a charming place to watch the world go by. The charm is partly by design — it’s a modern take on the original 1800s market district. Also, Market Square is home to Guelph’s impressive City Hall, live performances, and events including the annual fall Jazz Festival. Plus, there are plenty of tasty treats nearby, with downtown restaurants just steps away. (A few possible spots to choose from: Planet Bean Coffee, Eric the Baker, La Cucina, Eat Thai, and Rise and Shine Island Flavour.) Guelph, it should be noted, is serious about food! Not surprising given its agricultural roots and embrace of culinary diversity.

Photo of Market Square courtesy of Brandon Marsh Photography.

THE JUNCTION & SUNNY ACRES; THE WARD & ST. GEORGES — 2:30 PM

THE JUNCTION AND THE WARD

Two of Guelph’s most intriguing neighbourhoods are adjacent to downtown. To the east, it’s St. Patrick’s Ward and St. Georges (sometimes just called “The Ward”) with architecture ranging from war-time bungalows to stately Victorian homes. The Ward is also where you’ll find Guelph Little Theatre, which lives up to its slogan: a little theatre with big productions. GLT has a big history too, bringing outstanding amateur performances to theatre-goers since 1935. Next, head west to the Junction & Sunny Acres neighbourhood, the “junction” part of the name a nod to the former Guelph Junction Railway. You can see a living celebration of local railway history via “Blossom Junction,” a train made entirely of flowers. Also, don’t miss Heritage Hall nearby, current home of the Guelph Black Heritage Society. It holds a powerful history, having been built by former fugitive slaves who arrived via the Underground Railroad. Check the Heritage Society’s calendar for events that speak to that history through music, spoken word and more.

Heritage Hall by Brandon Marsh Photography.

RIVER RUN CENTRE — 7:30 PM

ARTS ON THE RIVER

The River Run is Guelph’s premiere performing arts centre, beautifully situated on the banks of the Speed River. The entrance alone is worth the visit with its copper wall a creation of Guelph artist Peter Johnston, and one that traces the history of those who’ve lived along the river from its earliest days. The centre itself opened in 1997, but a former inhabitant of the site, the Speed Skating Rink, provided entertainment of its own right. Once upon a time, orchestras played graceful waltzes as skaters circled the rink. Today, The River Run Centre is the place to go for a full range of performing arts including concerts, musicals, plays, dance and shows aimed at the whole family.

Photo courtesy of Dean Palmer.

Day Two

THE ARBORETUM — 10:30 AM

A WORLD OF TREES

Open from dawn ‘til dusk, the outdoor Arboretum is a living classroom for University of Guelph students and faculty but it’s also a relaxing place for all to stroll. The extensive gardens, forests and trails include thematic collections like Native Trees of Ontario, centred around the conservation of the province’s native woody plants. And “World of Trees” is truly that — more than 400 species of trees and shrubs that help connect the dots between the similarities and differences of the northern hemisphere’s woody plants. There are plenty of walking trail possibilities, including The Trillium, a loop through ten plant collections, and the Mtigwaaki, designed in collaboration with Anishinaabe elders, knowledge holders and environmental scientists to share an understanding of the forest from an Anishinaabek perspective.

Arboretum, UofG

ART GALLERY OF GUELPH — 12:00 PM

ART IN THE GALLERY, ART IN THE GARDEN

The AGG is one of Canada’s leading galleries and sculpture parks, so naturally you’ll want to visit both. The only question is: where to start, inside or out? The Donald Forster Sculpture Park is the largest sculpture park at a public gallery in Canada, with diverse work by Canadian as well as international sculptors. Inside, there’s a strong focus on Indigenous and contemporary Canadian art, including a unique collection of Inuit drawings. Don’t miss the contemporary Canadian silver collection, the only one of its kind at a public gallery in Canada, and a top-notch showcase of the beautiful art of silversmithing.

Photo courtesy of the Art Gallery of Guelph

MCCRAE HOUSE — 2:00 PM

“THE LARKS, STILL BRAVELY SINGING…”

In Flanders Fields, the poppies blow…There is no more famous Canadian poem from the First World War — or possibly ever! Poet, doctor, and soldier John McCrae wrote it after a young friend died in the wake of the 1915 battle at Ypres, Belgium, not knowing the incredible impact his poem would have. Red poppies came to symbolize the soldiers who died during that war — including McCrae himself. McCrae House is the stone cottage where this extraordinary man was born in 1872, and it offers visitors a chance to learn more about the man behind the poem: from family life to his many medical and military accomplishments.

Photo of McCrae House courtesy of Brandon Marsh Photography.

ROYAL CITY PARK — 3:00 PM

REFLECTION BY THE RIVER

A five-minute walk from McCrae House brings you to Royal City Park, an ideal place to contemplate all that’s come before. The Sacred Fire Space located here was created by local Indigenous peoples, and is used for spiritual gatherings of prayer, gratitude, and personal healing. Walk the park’s nearly five-kilometre recreational trail to discover another way of experiencing the tranquility of the riverside.

Photo courtesy of Brandon Marsh Photography.

GUELPH’S CRAFT BREWERIES — 6:30 PM

BREWTIFUL, SPIRITED GUELPH

Some around Guelph say that “beer built this town,” given the importance of early breweries to the city’s commerce. Perhaps most famous is Sleeman Breweries, which dates back to the late 19th century. Today, Guelph is famed for its craft beer, and you’ll find new favourites across the city including Brothers Brewing Company, Royal City Brewing Company, Fixed Gear, and Canada’s oldest independently owned microbrewery Wellington Brewery – all of which warmly welcome visitors. And if beer isn’t your thing, not to worry, Guelph is also home to two distilleries – Spring Mill Distillery and Dixon’s Distilled Spirits. Cheers!

Photo courtesy of Wellington Brewery.

YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE

This guide represents a weekend-long experience, highlighting one of the many wonderful destinations in the area. To suggest a destination for a future guide, please contact us.

All editorial decisions were made at the sole discretion of Ontario Culture Days staff. This guide was written by Li Robbins.


We acknowledge the support of the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario.


Manitoulin Island

© Photographer: Peter Baumgarten

Français

Manitoulin Island

Welcome to the largest freshwater lake island on the planet. Odawa Mnis (a.k.a. Manitoulin Island) is known for the natural beauty found in its winding trails, views of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay and over one hundred inland lakes. As home to six First Nation communities, including the famously unceded Wiikwemkoong, as well as nearby Whitefish River and Sagamok First Nations, the Island is imbued with Indigenous history and culture.

July 15, 2022



Day One

WIIKWEMKOONG — 10:00 AM

A PROUD HERITAGE

Wiky, as it’s known locally, is unique in being unceded Indigenous territory, meaning the rights to the land were never signed away to any nation. Guided tours are one way of learning about this proud heritage, with a range of tour possibilities depending on the day. Paddle through fishing islands along Lake Huron and gaze upon the La Chloche Mountain range on the “Bay of the Beaver Canoe” tour. “The Unceded Journey” tour takes you to historic sites to gain an understanding of the seminal 1836 and 1862 treaties, and to learn local lore and legend. Wikwemikong Tourism is your port of call to find out more and to book tours. Speaking of booking tours, you may also want to look into the possibility of a viewing at the Mishibinijima Private Art Gallery where you’ll see the stunning work of artist James Mishibinijima.

Bay of the Beaver Canoe Tour. Photo courtesy of Wiikwemkoong Tourism.

BEBAMIKAWE MEMORIAL TRAIL - 1:00 PM

EXPLORING THE TRAIL

As a visitor to Wiky you’re invited to learn more about traditions of the Anishinaabek people of the Three Fires Confederacy: Ojibwe, Odawa, and Potawatomi. One way to do this is through events (notably the Annual Cultural Festival, one of the largest Pow Wows in north-eastern North America). You can also take time to walk some of the professionally built 12 kilometres of trails collectively known as the Bebamikawe Memorial Trail. Scenic lookout points provide information about Anishinaabek history and beautiful views of the North Channel and Georgian Bay. Fitness fans can lace up for the one-and-a-half kilometre (bicycle-friendly) training trail, and birders should definitely bring the binos.

Speaking of varied passions, en route to Little Current you’ll find the Rainbow Ridge Golf Course, one of many primarily Indigenous-owned businesses on the Island, located outside of the village of Manitowaning. Manitowaning is also home to critically acclaimed Debajehmujig Theatre Group, part of Debajehmujig Storytellers, a multi-disciplinary arts organization dedicated to the revitalization of the Anishnaabek culture, language and heritage. The site is open all day, and offers a gallery in addition to their theatre shows. Among their ground breaking work is 2022’s conclusion of an international trilogy that began in Mexico and Ireland — make sure to check the Debajehmujig website for any upcoming performances.

Wood Sculptures on the Bebamikawe Memorial Trail. Photo credit Peter Baumgarten, Creative Island Photography.

LITTLE CURRENT - 5:00 PM

BOATS, BBQ AND BREWS
A twenty-five minute drive brings you from Manitowaning to Little Current, the island’s four-season access point via the famous swing bridge. It’s also the Island’s largest town, so yes, an excellent spot for dinner. Popular spots include Manitoulin Brewing Company and Brewgers food truck, Elliott’s (classic Canadian cuisine) and The Anchor Inn Hotel (known for its whitefish). Three Cows and A Cone is fun option for pizza and (no surprise) ice cream. An after-dinner boardwalk stroll lets you peek at boats from all over the Great Lakes, as well as some from farther afield — makes sense, given that Georgian Bay’s north channel is considered some of the best freshwater boating anywhere. For live music visit Little Current in August to hit up the annual rock and country music festivals.

Manitoulin Brewing Company. Photo credit Peter Baumgarten, Creative Island Photography.

Day Two

CUP AND SAUCER TRAIL — 9:00 AM

CUP, SAUCER AND A HIKE – MICHIGIWADINONG

One of the Island’s best known attractions is The Cup and Saucer/Michigiwadinong trail, about a twenty minute drive west of Little Current on the Manitoulin extension of the Niagara Escarpment. Michigiwadinong means “bluff in the shape of a spearhead,” a reference to it being the place where famous trickster Nanabush lay down his spearpoints while fleeing Iroquois warriors (warriors he’d tormented for generations). The legend and the surrounding area’s history makes it an iconic spot. It’s also a hiker’s delight, with twelve kilometres of trails creating multiple options from fifteen minutes to four hours. There are good reasons it’s one of Ontario’s most popular hikes — magnificent 70 meter cliffs, wonderful views of the Island’s lakes and fields, and closeups of escarpment rock.

The Cup and Saucer/Michigiwadinong Trail. Photo credit Peter Baumgarten, Creative Island Photography.

M’CHIGEENG — 11:30 AM

HISTORY AND HERITAGE CRAFTS

You’ll find the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation in M’Chigeeng, with its museum, art gallery, gift shop and amphitheatre. Learn about Anishinaabe spiritual knowledge, history and cultural practices at the museum, and enjoy beautiful heritage crafts including porcupine quill boxes, ash and sweetgrass baskets, and antler carvings. Crafters and artists may also enjoy this area as it is home to Lillian’s Crafts (offering items made from local materials and artwork by Indigenous artists), as well as the original source for the much lauded Beam Paints (pigments harvested from the LaCloche mountain range).

Next, lunch. Maggie’s Café offers home cooking (literally — Maggie’s recipes are passed down from “Great Grandma Agnes Roy, Maggie Roy and Betsy Debassige”). Another option, Maja’s Garden Bistro, is a short jog south of town and is known for local food and organic baking. Film buff alert: the Weengushk Film Institute (an artist-focused film and TV training centre) is based in M’Chigeeng, and collaborates with the Weengushk International Film Festival to showcase work by Indigenous and diverse filmmakers.

Ojibwe Cultural Foundation. Photo credit Peter Baumgarten, Creative Island Photography.

KAGAWONG — 1:30 PM

“ONTARIO’S PRETTIEST VILLAGE”

Kagawong, located midway between between M’Chigeeng and Gore Bay, has been called Ontario’s prettiest village and no question it’s a picturesque waterfront town. That handsome limestone building you’ll spot is the Old Mill Heritage Centre, a former pulp mill turned art gallery and museum. Learn about the Island’s agricultural, military and shipping/fishing history, as well the tragic tale of Daniel Dodge, a scion of the automotive family of the same name. Kagawong is also home to Odemin Gallery, specializing in carving using wood, stone and bone found on the Island. Odemin is also a source for tours of the Cup and Saucer trail and the area’s most famous attraction, Bridal Veil Falls, a hidden gem of a waterfall. Swimmers come prepared. On a warm day you may want to traipse down the staircase and enjoy a dip below the falls.

Old Mill Heritage Centre. Photo credit Peter Baumgarten

PROVIDENCE BAY — 5:00 PM

SPECTACULAR SAND AND SUNSETS

Providence Bay is known for its spectacular sand beach — and equally spectacular sunsets. Originally called Bebekodawangog, meaning “where the beach curves around the water,” the story goes that it was settler survivors of a shipwreck who first referred to it as Providence. Shallow water makes it a family swimming destination, and it’s a draw for lake trout and salmon fishing. Gaze at Lake Huron from what’s arguably the best beach in Northern Ontario, or stroll the boardwalk, possibly with a cone in hand from Huron Island Time. For something more substantial there’s Lake Huron Fish and Chips — whitefish as always an Island delicacy. And the Mutchmor and Providence Peace Café is where you’ll find local artwork and fresh baked goods. If you’d like to get your bearings on the history and ecology of the bay, take time to visit the Discovery Centre. After all, visiting the Island is nothing if not about discovering what makes it such an intriguing destination.

Providence Bay. Photo credit Peter Baumgarten, Creative Island Photography.

Ontario Culture Days thanks Indigenous Tourism Ontario for their support and contributions to developing this itinerary


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE


NEED A MAP?

This guide represents a weekend-long experience, highlighting one of the many wonderful destinations in the area. To suggest a destination for a future guide, please contact us.

All editorial decisions were made at the sole discretion of Ontario Culture Days staff. This guide was written by Li Robbins.


We acknowledge the support of the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario.


Thunder Bay

Thunder Bay

Stunning landscape meets unique history in Thunder Bay. On the shores of Lake Superior, the city is an amalgamation of Fort William and Port Arthur and boasts the largest Finnish population per capita outside of Finland. Clues to the earliest inhabitants — stone tools, spear points — point to a 10,000-year history. On the traditional territory of the Anishinabek, the nearby Fort William First Nation is a hub for Northwestern Ontario Indigenous communities.

May 25, 2022



Day One

PRINCE ARTHUR’S LANDING — 10:00 AM

WALK THE WATERFRONT

Prince Arthur’s Landing is an excellent vantage point to experience this port city. Public walking paths and art displays make it a lovely spot to stroll and reflect. Visit the striking Spirit Garden, inspired in part by the vision of highly influential Anishinaabe painter Roy Thomas, incorporating Indigenous art and building techniques. The design raises the profile of Indigenous knowledge while restoring the waterfront with native vegetation. (Note: the Waterfront District is also home to the Ahnisnabae Art Gallery, founded by Roy Thomas’ widow, as well as the Wake The Giant Music Festival, celebrating inclusivity and Indigenous culture.) If your glimpse of the lake leaves you wanting more, consider booking a sail boat tour — you’ll find the craft of your choice with Sail Superior at Pier 3. Want to stay shoreward? The Alexander Henry is a museum of transportation — on a ship! Visit Goods and Co and other artisans and boutique retailers, or grab a bite in the Waterfront District.

Prince Arthur's Landing is a budding cultural hub with a great view. Photo credit: City of Thunder Bay.

BAY & ALGOMA - 12:00 PM

The pedestrian-friendly Bay & Algoma neighbourhood hints at Thunder Bay’s considerable Finnish and Scandinavian history with specialty shops like Finnport and The Kitchen Nook & The Finnish Bookstore. As you wander keep an eye out for other choice stops too, for instance, artist-owned-and-operated Fireweed and indie bookseller Entershine Bookshop. You’re spoiled for choice when it comes to refreshment possibilities: Madhouse, Bean Fiend, Rebel Salad, Nook, The Bridge Kitchen…you may just have to return to Bay & Algoma for dinner!

THUNDER BAY ART GALLERY - 3:00 PM

INSPIRING INDIGENOUS ART

A ten-minute drive brings you to the Thunder Bay Art Gallery. Specializing in art by contemporary Indigenous artists, the permanent collection of over 1,600 works aims to preserve the artistic expression and history of Northern Ontario notably Mary Ann Barkhouse, Christi Belcourt and Robert Houle. Art displayed in the gallery’s three exhibition spaces is only part of what makes the gallery tick: it’s also known for its workshops, artist talks and art camps.

Piitwewetam: Making is Medicine 2021. Installation image, Thunder Bay Art Gallery. Shannon Gustafson, Ryan Gustafson, Jade Gustafson, Justine Gustafson. Curated by Leanna and Jean Marshall. Photographer: Meaghan Eley

MAGNUS THEATRE — 7:30 PM

NORTHWESTERN ONTARIO’S ONLY PROFESSIONAL THEATRE

For fifty years the Magnus Theatre has been putting on artfully crafted productions that reflect the company’s vision of being a leader of “innovative and relevant” live theatre and arts education. Intimate, with 250 seats, and historic — the theatre is located in the Port Arthur Central Schoolhouse in Waverly Park — Magnus Theatre is where you can enjoy everything from musicals to ground-breaking contemporary drama, all presented by the only professional theatre company between Winnipeg and Sudbury.

Day Two

THUNDER BAY MUSEUM — 11:00 AM

FROM ONE FORT WILLIAM…

Start the day downtown in the Fort William Business District. (Those needing caffeine may wish to make a stop at Upshot Coffee House, with locally roasted coffee and artisanal pastries.) The south side core was home to the former city of Fort William and is where you’ll find the eye-catching Thunder Bay City Hall, plus the Northwestern Ontario Sports Hall of Fame and Northwestern Ontario Aviation Heritage Centre.

Head to the Thunder Bay Museum, housed in a former police station and courthouse. It’s a good place to explore some of the region’s history through Indigenous artifacts (including intricate Ojibway and Cree beadwork) as well as fur trade relics. You’ll also have the opportunity to learn about Thunder Bay’s industries through the ages, from silver mining to pulp and paper. All that and music too, with a gallery that chronicles Thunder Bay’s musical history from 1870s brass bands to 1970s rock bands.

FORT WILLIAM HISTORICAL PARK — 1:00 PM

… TO ANOTHER

A twenty-minute drive takes you from the Fort William district to Fort William Historical Park, a reconstruction of the 1816 fur trade post. It’s one of the largest living history attractions in North America, where period-costumed actors guide your way. Located on 250 acres, with over fifty heritage buildings (as well as a modern visitors’ centre), you’ll get a close up view of fur trade life via culture, crafts, farming, medicine and more. The Anishinaabe encampment (eye-witness accounts from the 1800s note an Indigenous camp east of the fort) and the Voyageurs encampment will give you a sense of the complicated intersection of Metis, Scottish, French Canadian and Ojibwa lives in the region. (Science sidebar: the state-of-the-art David Thompson Astronomical Observatory, located in the park, has one of the largest telescopes in central Canada.)

Photo courtesy of Destination Ontario

ANEMKI WAJIW/MOUNT MCKAY — 3:30 PM

VISIT THUNDER MOUNTAIN

Located on Fort William First Nation, a twelve-minute drive from Fort William Historical Park, lies Anemki Wajiw (Thunder Mountain), also known as Mount McKay and a site of spiritual significance for Indigenous peoples. As the tallest point in the Nor’Wester mountains, a group of peaks south of the city, the views are magnificent — from the lookout, you can see the city’s south side, Lake Superior, and also Nanabijou (the Sleeping Giant), a series of mesas with a rich history of Indigenous legends associated with their formation. (And yes, you guessed it, it looks like a sleeping giant!) For centuries a place for traditional Indigenous ceremonies, today it’s home to Fort William First Nation pow wows.

Fort Williams First Nations Reserve, Thunder Bay, Ontario. Photo courtesy of Destination Ontario

ECLECTIC RESTAURANTS — 6:00 PM

EXPLORE THUNDER BAY’S DINING DELIGHTS

We would be remiss not to note Thunder Bay’s burgeoning and increasingly eclectic restaurant scene. To name just a few hot spots, there’s Caribou Restaurant + Winebar’s “North American modern,” Tomlin’s seasonal share plates, Bight’s Canadian fare (with a lakefront setting), Kangas Sauna, specializing in Finnish pancakes (and sauna rentals), Red Lion Smokehouse (think: pulled pork) and The Growing Season Juice Collective (cheery and health-conscious).

THUNDER BAY COMMUNITY AUDITORIUM — 8:00 PM

HEAD TO PAUL SHAFFER DRIVE FOR A SHOW

Superior acoustics and a warm, intimate environment make the TBCA a fine concert hall, home to the Thunder Bay Symphony orchestra with its full season of masterworks and pops programs. It’s also the place to catch comedy, dance, pop and rock, and you’ll find all of that on Paul Shaffer Drive, named in honour of Thunder Bay’s own Paul Shaffer of The Late Show With David Letterman fame.


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE

This guide represents a weekend-long experience, highlighting one of the many wonderful destinations in the area. To suggest a destination for a future guide, please contact us.
All editorial decisions were made at the sole discretion of Ontario Culture Days staff. This guide was written by Li Robbins.


We acknowledge the support of the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario.


Durham Region North

Photo: Image reproduced with the permission of Ocala Winery & Orchards

Français

Durham Region North

From lake to lake — Scugog to Simcoe — Durham Region North is a rural Ontario destination known for rolling farmlands, charming towns, and the Oak Ridges Moraine, one of the most important formations in Ontario’s greenbelt. All that, plus a vibrant arts and cultural scene.

May 18, 2022



Day One

SCUGOG SHORES MUSEUM — 10:00 AM

SCUGOG HERITAGE AND HISTORY

Some believe the word “Scugog” comes from the Mississauga “sigaog,” meaning “waves leap over a canoe.” Others, that it’s an Ojibwe word meaning swampy land. Either way, Lake Scugog is at the heart of Scugog Township, and the result of the Scugog River being dammed in 1834. Scugog Shores Museum, located on Scugog Island overlooking Port Perry, is a great way to get a sense of the history. The island is home to the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation, owners of local attraction Great Blue Heron Casino, and hosts of the annual Mississauga First Nation Pow Wow. To explore the cultural history of the Scugog watershed before Europeans arrived, visit the museum’s Ojibway Heritage Interpretive Lands. You can also get a sense of 19th century daily settler life at the Scugog Shores Museum Village.

Image courtesy of Scugog Shores Museum Village and Archives. Photo credit David Brooks

PORT PERRY — 12:00 PM

GALLERY HOPPING IN PORT PERRY

Hard to think of a nicer lakeside spot than Port Perry with its Victorian-era downtown that brims with boutiques, restaurants, galleries and antique shops. (Its charm makes it a frequent film and TV shoot location.) Port Perry is also a base for festive goings on, including Theatre On The Ridge, The Dragon Boat Festival and the award-winning Port Perry Fair. Make time to gallery hop though, since there’s an abundance of possibilities: Scugog Arts, Meta4 Contemporary Craft Gallery, Croftbeg Studio/Gallery, and Kent Farndale Gallery among others.

Image courtesy of Theatre on the Ridge

PALMER PARK — 2:00 PM

AN AFTERNOON IN THE PARK

Palmer Park is part of Port Perry’s appeal, a scenic waterfront right downtown. Perfect for a picnic, it’s also conveniently close to restaurants and cafés, including the lakeside Boathouse Grill, Piano Inn and Café, and The Pantry Shelf. Water is a theme, with a splash pad for the kids and plenty of folks fishing nearby. (In winter the lake is dotted with ice fishing huts.) Summer Saturday visitors will want to check out the Port Perry Lakefront Farmers’ Market for its local products and artisanal goods. Adjacent Bird’s Eye Park provides tranquil walks with stunning views of the lake.

Image courtesy of the Piano Inn & Cafe

OCALA WINERY & ORCHARD — 4:00 PM

VISIT THE VINES

Just a twelve minute drive south west of Port Perry you’ll find Durham Region’s only grape grower, with twenty-five varieties of fruit and six varieties of grapes. Ocala Winery & Orchard dates back to 1912, and you can still enjoy the century-old apple orchard — and maybe a wine tasting too. (If beer’s the thing, drop by local craft brewers, Old Flame Brewing Co. back in town.) Dinner in Port Perry is always a good option. A few popular spots include The Foundry Kitchen & Bar, Pickles and Olives Bistro, and Marwan’s Global Bistro.

Image courtesy of Ocala Winery & Orchards

TOWN HALL THEATRE — 8:00 PM

GO TO TOWN (HALL) FOR ENTERTAINMENT

The Town Hall Theatre building has been a Port Perry landmark in the community throughout its century-and-a-half history. And what a history it is: it’s served as municipal town hall, fire station, courthouse, roller skating rink, undergarment factory, movie theatre, and, since the 1970s, a live performance venue. Today it’s a prime spot for award-winning plays and musicals, live jazz, blues and classic rock, comedy, improv, kids shows and more. No wonder it’s considered the centre for performing arts in Durham Region.

Image courtesy of Port Perry BIA. Photo credit Melissa Rada

Day Two

UXBRIDGE SELF-GUIDED ART TOUR — 10:30 AM

ART IN THE VALLEY

Uxbridge Township is officially designated “The Trail Capital Of Canada,” given its 220 kilometers of managed trails. But the town of Uxbridge itself, located in an Oak Ridges Moraine valley, is also known for its art and artists, as a self-guided downtown walking tour reveals. Uxbridge also has a strong music history, with one of its earliest industries the Uxbridge Organ Co., established in 1872. Its legacy as a music town lives in in the Music Hall, known for excellent acoustics and beauty, its balcony graced by original opera chairs behind a carved iron railing. Should you need caffeination one favourite is The Bridge Social with its pithy slogan: “Coffee. Trails. Repeat.” Uxbridge is also chockablock with restaurants of all kinds, from tacos to sushi to deli to burgers, making it an ideal lunch stop.

Photo courtesy of Julia Shipcott, Uxbridge BIA

THOMAS FOSTER MEMORIAL — 12:30 PM

THE TAJ MAHAL OF ONTARIO

The Taj Mahal in India, dating back to 1632, was the vision of Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan. The Thomas Foster Memorial, dating back to 1935, was the vision of one-time Uxbridge boy Thomas Foster, who’d visited the Taj Mahal and was inspired to construct his own mausoleum. Foster, who went from working as a butcher’s boy in Toronto to becoming the city’s mayor in 1925, left behind this eye-catching monument, a startling sight on a hilly road in rural Ontario. A beautiful one too, with marble, frescoes, stone pillars and stained glass. During summer months you can hear live music, from folk to jazz.

Crédit photo: Rick Harris

LEASKDALE MANSE — 2:30 PM

ANNE OF LEASKDALE

Beloved children’s book author Lucy Maud Montgomery is best known for Anne of Green Gables, set in Prince Edward Island. But she wrote 11 of her 22 published novels in Leaskdale (just north of Uxbridge) from 1911 to1926, where she lived with her minister husband and her sons. Today her husband’s church, St. Paul’s Presbyterian, is a museum filled with L.M. Montgomery memorabilia and the manse has been restored to reflect what it was like in the famous “Anne-with-an-e” author’s time. If you want to explore the area a little further, try driving the Leaskdale Loop, a 20 kilometre cornucopia of maple syrup, farm fresh vegetables, baked goods and local honey.

Photo credit: The Lucy Maud Montgomery Society of Ontario.

SUNDERLAND, CANNINGTON, BEAVERTON — 4:00 PM

THE VILLAGES OF BROCK

Durham Region’s northernmost township is Brock, bordered by Lake Simcoe on the west and home to three distinct villages. Why not visit each one as you make your way to the shores of Lake Simcoe. Sunderland, in the midst of farmland, is home to the historic Sunderland Town Hall (1871), the hundred-plus years fall fair, and the popular Maple Syrup Festival. Cannington has both the charm of Victorian era architecture and the practicality of being a great jumping off point for hikers. Finally it’s Beaverton, where the Beaver River and Lake Simcoe meet. Cottagers and day trippers alike enjoy Beaverton’s harbour by summer, and winter months bring avid ice-fishers to its shores. Have a peek at The Old Stone Church, a modest yet striking building from the mid-nineteenth century, and one of the few original stone churches in Canada.

Image courtsey of Sunderland Maple Syrup Festival. Photo Credit Ron Dempster. 

BEAVERTON TOWN HALL PLAYERS — 8:00 PM

LET THEM ENTERTAIN YOU

Local theatre with a heartfelt motto: “Let Us Entertain You,” The Beaverton Town Hall Players put on concerts, musicals, comedies and dramas in the restored 1910 town hall-turned-performance space. Boasting a friendly, intimate atmosphere, the theatre group’s mix of professional and amateur players has delighted audiences for the past three decades.


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE


NEED A MAP?

This guide represents a weekend-long experience, highlighting one of the many wonderful destinations in the area. To suggest a destination for a future guide, please contact us.

Ontario Culture Days thanks its tourism partners Durham Region for their support and assistance with this article. All editorial decisions were made at the sole discretion of Ontario Culture Days staff. This guide was written by Li Robbins.


We acknowledge the support of the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario.


Durham Region South

Photo: Pickering Marina. Credit: Captured by Sage

Français

Durham Region South

Durham Region South is conveniently located a stone’s throw from Toronto and offers day-tripping possibilities galore. The region hugs Lake Ontario from Bowmanville to Pickering, making it easy to skip from location to location — and savour lakeside vistas. The lake and the land have held significance for centuries, as the Mississaugas, a branch of the Ojibwa Nation, moved into region circa 1700.

April 29, 2022



Day One

VISUAL ARTS CENTRE OF CLARINGTON — 10:00 AM

SMALL TOWN CHARM IN BOWMANVILLE

Known for both its art exhibitions and unique location, the VAC is in a 19th century barley mill on the banks of Soper Creek. It features both local and national contemporary visual art (and a glorious loft space with original wooden beams soaring overhead). It’s also an education centre, hosting artist talks aimed at making art an interactive exchange of ideas. Regular visitors, get your hands wet! Painting and pottery classes are on offer.

Bowmanville is a charmer with its walkable historic downtown, classic Canadian main street, and grand Victorian mansions. Caffeinate at Roam Coffee or The Toasted Walnut (the latter also serves up homemade meals) or shop at Market By Dream Day (“your one-stop shop for everything local.”) Once the sun is over the yard arm consider a visit to local craft brewery, Chronicle Brewing.

Image courtesy of Clarington Tourism

TYRONE MILLS — 11:00 AM

POWERED BY WATER (AND APPLE CIDER)

Alternatively, spend the first half of the day out at Tyrone Mills. For over 170 years Tyrone Mills (a thirteen minute drive north of Bowmanville) has served as a grist, flour and lumber mill. Today, it still uses water power for lumber manufacturing and flour production. Take a tour of the mill or sample local wares and baked goods (apple cider donuts, anyone?). Speaking of apples, en route to the mill drop by Archibald’s Estate Winery, specializing in apple wine recipes. Discover the many temptations of apple-based wines, from sweet to dry, in a complimentary tasting.

Photo courtesy of Archibald Orchards & Estate Winery

URBN | MRKT OSHAWA — 1:30 PM

NOSH IN OSHAWA

Opened in 2021 in a downtown Oshawa landmark, the former RBC building, URBN MRKT has quickly become a favourite spot, with tasty snacks ranging from Korean barbeque to classic Quebec poutine. It’s the place to shop for farm-fresh local produce and artisanal products — more an experience than a stroll through your average grocery store! If a sit-down restaurant’s your thing, downtown Oshawa has plenty on offer, including Street MoMo’s Indian-Asian cuisine or The White Apron’s “comfort classics.”

OSHAWA MUSEUMS — 2:00 PM

BOOKEND YOUR DAY WITH ART…

Visit Oshawa’s Robert McLaughlin Gallery, known for the most extensive collection in Canada of the Painters Eleven — Ontario abstract painters who helped popularize the art form. While the gallery’s main focus has historically leaned European-ward, you’ll also find striking work by Indigenous artists. As for the gallery’s name, it’s a tip of the hat to the founder of what became General Motors Canada. (The auto baron’s former residence, The Parkwood Estate, also makes for an interesting visit.) The RMG itself was expanded in 1987 by famed architect Arthur Erickson, who created its dramatic, light-filled lobby.
…OR BOOKEND YOUR DAY WITH HISTORY

Oshawa is sometimes viewed as the eastern anchor of the Greater Toronto Area, and it’s rich with history. For example, the automotive legacy — it’s historically known as Canada’s Motor City, as a visit to the Canadian Automotive Museum demonstrates. You’ll find another significant vehicle display at the Ontario Regiment RCAC Museum, with the largest collection of military vehicles in North America. To learn about the history of Oshawa residents, including the area’s Indigenous past and the history of its Black population (the latter dating back to at least 1850), head for the Oshawa Museum, nestled on the shores of Lake Ontario.

Photo: Image reproduite avec l'aimable autorisation du Musée canadien de l'automobile.

Day Two

LYNDE HOUSE MUSEUM — 10:30 AM

THE OLDEST HOUSE IN DURHAM

Whitby is home to the Lynde House, named for Jabez Lynde, a United Empire Loyalist who served in the war of 1812. During that time his home became an inn, a tavern, and a supply depot where the British and First Nations militia could load up heading to battle. Since then the house has moved twice (with thousands lining the streets to watch) to its current location. In summer, savour Clarissa Lynde’s Heritage Kitchen Garden, with plantings typical of the 1800s — chamomile, calendula, yara, savoury and the like. Or drop into the little brick building next door, the Warren General Store, for gifts, home décor and sweet treats.

Image courtesy of Lynde House Museum

STATION GALLERY — 12:00 PM

ART IN THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY STATION

Arts and culture abound in the region, and the Station Gallery has been celebrating that fact since 1967 when passionate arts enthusiasts opened the first community gallery. Next, they bought the local Grand Trunk Railway Station (for a dollar — it was slated for demolition) and made it the gallery’s new home. Today the renovated station features exhibitions by emerging, mid-career and established artists, as well as classes, workshops, performances and special events, making it “a champion of all things empowering and creative.”

Image courtesy of Station Gallery

AJAX — 2:00 PM

WEND YOUR WAY ALONG THE WATERFRONT TRAIL

Before exploring Ajax’s impressive 400 hectares of open space, parks, playgrounds and conservation areas, consider a lunch stop. Two possibilities: The Portly Piper for classic pub fare, or Maimana Naan & Kabab for its cultural crossroads of Afghani, Indian, Greek and Iranian-inspired cuisine. After that, yes to exercise! No better place than the Waterfront Trail, winding through Ajax’s lovely parks. Along the way, linger at Veteran’s Point Gardens. It’s a contemplative spot where you can absorb the history of Ajax and World War ll, and its intriguing design conjures up the shape of a ship.

PICKERING NAUTICAL VILLAGE — 4:00 PM

RELAXING IN THE VILLAGE

Frenchman’s Bay is home to the unique waterfront community of Pickering Nautical Village. Between the beach, the boardwalk, and the boat launch there’s something for everyone. (Including a splash pad, swings and slides for the kids.) Open Studio Art Café has live art (life drawing) and live music (open mics and concerts). Dining choices range from North American bistro fare at Port, with waterfront views, the Mexican-inspired Chúuk, and Zeera By The Bay for traditional Indian food. (Note too that Pickering is home to mouth-watering Caribbean deliciousness, found at Beryl’s Pepper Pot, Roti N’Ting and Yardies Carribean Cuisine, among others.) For afters consider GrandDad’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream Parlour, home to every conceivable flavour of Ontario favourites: Kawartha Dairy, Chapman’s, and Central Smith.

Image courtesy of Chúuk

ST. FRANCIS CENTRE; HERONGATE BARN THEATRE — 7:00 PM

BE ENTERTAINED IN A FORMER CHURCH…OR BARN

Have a look at what’s on at St. Francis Centre for Community, Arts & Culture or the Herongate Barn Theatre. St. Francis, built in 1871, is an excellent example of High Victorian Gothic church architecture. It’s also an excellent example of a state-of-the-art performance space for music, theatre and comedy. A fifteen-minute drive away you’ll find another unique entertainment setting: Herongate Barn Theatre, housed in a century-old dairy farm. Dine in a former bull pen or hay manger then head up to the renovated loft for laughs or gasps — the Herongate specializes in staged comedies and mysteries.


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE


YOUR TRIP AT A GLANCE

This guide represents a weekend-long experience, highlighting one of the many wonderful destinations in the area. To suggest a destination for a future guide, please contact us.
Ontario Culture Days thanks its tourism partners Durham Region for their support and assistance with this article. All editorial decisions were made at the sole discretion of Ontario Culture Days staff. This guide was written by Li Robbins.


We acknowledge the support of the Government of Canada through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario.